William Hicks Masonry
P. O. Box 1062, Siler City, North Carolina 27344
(919)742-3418 or email Bill through the website

There are sixteen views of this project on this page.
thick veneer, dry stacking with boulders


(ABOVE) The marvelous hillside of boulders are a backdrop for my wall, and some of the smaller boulders are incorporated into it.  This wall is built with the same kind of stone, weathered sandstone, as used on the Brown project (inside, outside), but different sides of the stone are visible when finished.  The Brown project shows the "faces," sticking the stone on the wall.  For this Burwell project, the stones are "laid" up as blocks or bricks are "laid," and the edges of the stones are visible. Click on any image on this page for a larger version.  Use your browser's back button to return.
(ABOVE) Behind the stone face I'm using cinderblocks with vertical rebar at 4' intervals.  The whole wall, some 90 feet long and 4 feet high for most of its length, sits on a rebar reinforced footing, and the wall is laid to the front of the footing so that the weight of the earth being retained will counterbalance its own outpressing force--the earth sits on what it's trying to push over, so to speak.   The block in the back just adds thickness (and therefore strength) to the wall where it doesn't show, the thicker the better for a retaining wall.  The two pictures above show the start of the wall, the two below show the cinderblocks disappearing as the wall reaches its full height. Click on any image on this page for a larger version.  Use your browser's back button to return.
(ABOVE) Once I establish the top at one place (on the left), I can run a level line to a stake past where the wall will eventually go and work to that line.  It's always a nice feeling to see the top. At the far end (above right) I'm going to make a hard right and build some steps up to the top of the bank. Click on any image on this page for a larger version.  Use your browser's back button to return.
Progress...and the steps start to take shape on the right. 

The steps are a way to get from the level of the yard up to the steep hill behind the wall and also a way to get to the other side of the yard, which is bisected by a little decorative bridge from the owner's deck to the hill.  The landscaper asked me to put a planter at the side of the steps.  I built the steps up to the edge of the bank behind, then poured a reinforced footing across and up the bank to an existing path from the bridge, then built the top step and a bit of sidewalk or landing over to where the existing path intersects.
The end is near...
Done...and the mason rested.
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